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Traditional vs. Standard Scores

In the standard chart, two types of scores can be entered: traditional and standard. Traditional scores are the percents-based scores that virtually all grading programs have been designed to handle: 8/10 = 80% B-. Standard scores are scores that correlate to the levels in a rubric: 2.00 = Meets Standard. In standards-based grading, traditional scores are not required. However, they can be used in beneficial ways. For example:

  • Traditional scores can be used in exactly the same way as they are used in non-standards-based grading. In other words, a teacher can continue to grade based on traditional grading methods and simply add standards-based grading to the process.
  • Traditional grades can be used to record completion only. For example, a teacher may use the special scores yes, no, mi, ab, inc, etc. to keep track of whether assignments have been completed or not. With this method, missing work reports can still be generated.
  • Traditional scores can be used to keep track of an effort grade using a typical A, B, C grade scale or some other scale. Although an effort standard could easily be set up, using traditional grading for effort allows effort on and performance on skill-based standards to be graded separately.

Entering traditional scores:

In the 1-Assignment chart, traditional scores can be entered into the column with the assignment’s name. In the 1-Student chart, traditional scores can be entered into the first row below all of the assignment names. Since scores can be entered using the same techniques described in Using the Score Chart, the information will not be duplicated here.

In the standard chart, two types of scores can be entered: traditional and standard. Traditional scores are the percents-based scores that virtually all grading programs have been designed to handle: 8/10 = 80% B-. Standard scores are scores that correlate to the levels in a rubric: 2.00 = Meets Standard. In standards-based grading, traditional scores are not required. However, they can be used in beneficial ways. For example:

  • Traditional scores can be used in exactly the same way as they are used in non-standards-based grading. In other words, a teacher can continue to grade based on traditional grading methods and simply add standards-based grading to the process.
  • Traditional grades can be used to record completion only. For example, a teacher may use the special scores yes, no, mi, ab, inc, etc. to keep track of whether assignments have been completed or not. With this method, missing work reports can still be generated.
  • Traditional scores can be used to keep track of an effort grade using a typical A, B, C grade scale or some other scale. Although an effort standard could easily be set up, using traditional grading for effort allows effort on and performance on skill-based standards to be graded separately.

Entering traditional scores:

In the 1-Assignment chart, traditional scores can be entered into the column with the assignment’s name. In the 1-Student chart, traditional scores can be entered into the first row below all of the assignment names. Since scores can be entered using the same techniques described in Using the Score Chart, the information will not be duplicated here.